Tips for Writing a Nomination

Use the information below to help you write a convincing and engaging nomination.

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Tips for Writing a Nomination

  1. Choose a category. Describe how your nominee meets the criteria of the category you have selected.
  2. Use these nomination questions as a guide. Respond to as many of the questions that apply to your nominee's situation.
  3. Get support. Split up the nomination questions and/or award criteria with co-workers to share writing the nomination text. Ask co-workers, supervisors, students, and/or faculty (including those in other departments, labs, or centers who may work with the nominee) to submit a detailed statement in support of your nomination. A maximum of 2 one-page statements of support will be accepted per nomination.
  4. Use bullet points. Don't worry about crafting beautiful paragraphs - provide information in a bulleted list.
  5. Avoid jargon. While you are familiar with your nominee’s work, more than likely the members of the selection committee won’t be. Keep that in mind as you describe the nature and quality of the contributions and accomplishments.
  6. Include measurable results. Where possible, include measurable results (e.g., monetary savings, a new product or service, clients receiving goods or services in a more timely and/or professional manner, staff morale increasing, students being more informed and better prepared for courses or graduation, etc.).
  7. Use multiple examples. Include more than one example (the more the better) of how the individual or team went above and beyond the daily responsibilities of the job. See examples of strong nomination responses.
  8. Submit for both awards. If you wrote an Infinite Mile Award nomination this year, you can also submit it for an Excellence Award or Collier Medal - your nominee is eligible for both. Be sure to review the Excellence Award categories and tailor the nomination to fit one of them.
  9. Keep recognizing. If you submitted an Excellence Award or Collier Medal nomination last year, consider revising it and citing most recent, specific examples of contributions made over this year and resubmit.